A Teaching Moment

Yesterday I took a bike ride. I rode one of my favorite routes to Cascade Lake. I like to go to this State Park Day Use area, sit on the rocks and watch the activities on the lake. I started out in the partial sun and arrived back at my current home in smoke-filled skies. What a change a few hours can make.

Something I will never do.

As I was riding on the paved trails I encountered a small garter snake. It was trying to cross the path as I was biking by. If you have read my previous post Snakes! you know that I am not fond of snakes. In fact, I am a bit afraid of them. They always surprise me and cause my heart to race.

Here is this poor snake, it sees my bike and I see the snake. I immediately think “Oh my God, I am going to run over this snake and it is going to get stuck in my spokes and be tossed on me. I freaked. The snake freaked. It started to squiggle back and forth rapidly on the trail, not knowing what direction to head to avoid that big object coming at it. Know that this all happened in a few moments of time.

After this event I began to think of this poor snake, rapidly moving back and forth on the trail trying to escape my bike and find safety. It finally succeeded and moved off the trail into the undergrowth. I was thankful and I imagine it was thankful too.

How many times have I done this in my life when confronted with the unknown and challenges and stressful moments? Do I move rapidly in many directions before I finally recognize the obstacle and figure a way to overcome the situation I am in? How long do I move back and forth and go through the darkness of indecision before I finally find my way out of my predicament? Is it a split second, days weeks, or years?

I believe that as humans we all do this at times in our lives. When confronted with the unknown or stress or the need to make a decision, we have to move back and forth and around, trying to figure out the best approach to find the most correct result. Sometimes the best thing we can do is move back to where we previously were. Sometimes we force ourselves forward to achieve that next goal or slip through the obstacle that confronts us. Sometimes we slither back and forth rapidly on the trail.

Avoiding decisions or opportunities is not possible, something will move us forward. We have to move in one direction or another. If one approach doesn’t work then it is important to look at other possibilities. Just like that little, harmless snake, we try out different things until the right way presents itself.

Who knew that this moment in time would give me reflection on a much larger and broader subject. I have thought about this snake a lot since I saw it yesterday. Symbols are important to me. Sometimes one word or act allows me to see the much larger picture or the smaller details. Maybe this garter snake was simply feeling everything out in a nanosecond and unconsciously chose the quickest way out. For me, it represented a bit more than the quick way out. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on this topic.

Cascade Lake

Today I am thankful for all living things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling a Sense of Accomplishment

Biking the Idaho backroads

This past spring I acquired a new-to-me bicycle. I have been making it mine.

First, there was a new saddle. I added the saddle myself and with the help of a local San Diego bike shop adjusted it to fit. I added new peddles. I got a new tool to help me get the old ones off and put the new ones on. I love tools. I have added my rear and front lights, and a speedometer. I bought a new saddle bag and new water bottle and I was ready to ride.

Cascade Lake

I have been enjoying the long-empty expanses of roads in Idaho. I can ride forever. Since I am staying near a lake I get to explore different sections of Lake Cascade. I take my cell phone with me so I have a library book with me. I can stop and sit near the lake and read. I can watch the activity on or near the lake. Yesterday I found two balk eagles sitting in a dead tree.

 

I had noticed that my handlebars were going to need new handlebar tape. Areas were getting thin and worn. After researching handlebar tape I took the plunge and bought the tape and decided that this was a project I could do.

Since Jim’s death over seven years ago, I have found YouTube to be a good friend. I turn to YouTube like it is a friend who might have the right answer for my situation. Sometimes I end up acknowledging that the project might be a bit more than I can handle. I then look for the experts to help me out.

Wrapping my handlebars appeared to be something that I could challenge myself to do. Yesterday afternoon after watching one more video I removed the old tape and started to apply the new. Nothing is as easy as it looks. It took me two hours to finally complete the project. I stretched and slowly adjusted the tape around each bar. It was work and my hands were a bit sore and raw feeling by the end of this home project. Yet I walked out of the garage feeling accomplished and proud.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Often when it came to home projects, Jim was the one to take the lead. I was second in command. Now I have to take the lead. I am the lead and the second in command. Projects don’t have to be large or complicated to make me feel a sense of accomplishment. Each time I do something and it is successful, I feel pride in myself. I took another project on and was successful. If I need to do it again, and I will, I know I can tackle it again and it will go a bit smoother and quicker than the last project.

Now it is time to take a ride and test out the new handlebar tape. I keep moving forward one step at a time

Snakes!!!

I am not fond of snakes. They are startling and sneaky even if they don’t mean to be. They startle and surprise me and I am not fond of them.

When I was young my mother and father built our family home on a piece of farmland in Delaware (the second smallest state in the nation). Since there were three children we were responsible for “doing the dishes”. In case you don’t know what that is, it means that after dinner we were responsible for washing, drying, and putting away the dinner dishes.

One spring evening my sisters and I were about to embark on our dishwashing duties. My mother noticed I did not have shoes on and told me to go and put a pair on before I helped with the after-dinner task. Merrily I meandered into my bedroom, not watching where I was going, I stepped on something slimy and slithery and it dashed into my closet. I screamed, ran into the kitchen yelling about the snake. All three girls ran out of the house and ran circles around my parents in the garden, yelling about the snake. We wouldn’t return to the house until my father captured the poor wee garden snake and killed it.

I have no doubt that my fear of snakes began at that moment. I have been known to go out of my way to move around a snake. It is not unusual for me to turn around on a hike when I encounter a slithering thing on the trail, especially one with rattles. I am wary of snakes. I will never put a snake of any sort on my shoulders. I will never hold one, although I have touched a few.

One time I was hiking in the Tetons with a good friend, Diane. We hiked the Cascade Trail into the heart of the Mountains, our destination a lake. We were sitting on a log, dangling our feet in the lake when I looked down and there were these squiggly things all around our legs. Watersnake hatchlings!! Oh my!! My breath quickened. I told Diane my fear of snakes, so we moved to the rocky shore, only to discover more small slithery things among the rocks. I finally told Diane I had to go. So we hiked out. After were safely back at the campsite my hiking companion told me that she had seen more of those little things on the hike out. Remembering that still can cause a catch in my breath.

I have had other encounters with snakes since then and I admit to being a bit better with the confrontation of those sneaky reptiles. I have encouraged myself to learn about them. l have researched them and read about them. I know all the good they can do. They are an important part of all ecosystems. With the San Diego Zoo close to my home for many years, I would often go to visit. I always made sure to go to the Reptile House. I figure that it would help me get over my fear. I figure they were safe behind glass. Then Harry Potter came into the picture and I have to admit, I hope the glass holds when I go into the “Snake” House.

 

While in South Africa Phyllis and I got to see some really colorful snakes at one of our stops early on the trip. They are pretty and colorful. Even there I had to tell Phyllis after a short time that I needed to leave. One of them coiled and jumped towards the glass and that was it. I had enough. Ah, snakes!

Why am I telling you this? I was kayaking on Cascade Lake and the North Fork of the Payette River earlier this week. I was paddling north enjoying the birds and the dragonflies and all the nature around me. Suddenly I saw a small head moving across the water. Quickly I realized it was a small (very small snake). I turned around and began to paddle towards it. I wanted to look at it. As I turned to do so, it turned right towards my boat. Instantly fear took over and I went into flight or fight mode. My heart rate picked up. I was sure that the snake was going to swim to my boat and get in. I panicked and turned that kayak around and paddled as hard as I could to get away from it. It felt like I paddled hard for five minutes or more. However, I think I paddled hard for maybe a minute at most. That little tiny snake was not going to get me. Why did it have to turn and swim toward my boat? Once I was sure that the little wiggly thing was not behind me I slowed down and continued to enjoy my morning. I kept an eye out for all things squiggly for the rest of the kayak.

Fear of snakes, Fear of spiders, Fear of water, whatever the fear, it is not rational. These are phobias and most of us live with one or more of them. I know my fear of snakes is not rational. I know I can control the situation. I have proven that to myself in the past. On the river, I did not prove myself to be brave and fearless. That little snake made me realize I still have more work to do.

What are you afraid of?

 

Getting Ready to Roll in the Time of Covid

My Roadtrek

In RV lingo – I am getting ready to roll.  I am going


to be moving back into my sweet little Roadtrek and heading out into the wide-open spaces of the American West.

All good things come to an end. My time “Sheltering in Place” with my friends, Cynthia and Ward is coming to a close. It is time to give them their home back. We have gotten along more than well, not one argument. I will miss them. This three-month adventure has made me realize that community living is definitely possible.

Where am I going?  I am heading north. As I am sitting in the middle of a Santa Ana and things are warming up in San Diego county I realize it is time to head for the coast and the mountains in search of cooler weather. First I will venture to Ventura for a few days to meet up with Dan Neeley of Dan Neeley RV Services who knows all things Roadtrek. It is time to get some work done on my rig. We have been trying to get together since January, without success.

I have good friends in so many places. It makes it easy to travel and feel safe from all those germs out there. A few summers ago Miss Elsie the Cat and I spent most of a summer in Donnelly, Idaho. My good friend Linda and her husband, Steve, offered us the use of their cabin in the mountains. It was a beautiful summer of hiking, biking, and using the lakes, that are generously dispersed throughout this beautiful country. It was also a summer of getting to know Linda and Steve better.

I am returning sans Elsie. I asked Linda if their second home might be available and without hesitation, she said yes. Why not shelter in place there? Why not enjoy the mountains and water? Why not?

My 1st Summer in Idaho

Ooooohh there are so many possibilities.

It is time to clean out my rig and put what is not needed into storage for the next several months. I am spending time cleaning and getting things done while still enjoying the company of my friends. My new bikes are getting excited. I occasionally hear their chains rattle in anticipation.

This will be the first adventure out since Covid 19 arrived on the American scene.

What will I do differently now than when I traveled before?

  • Wash my hands often.
  • Keep hand sanitizer readily available and use it.
  • Wear gloves when I pump gas. It had not occurred to me until Covid that touching a gas pump handle is dirty. Think of all the people who touch a handle on any given day. I have disposable gloves or work gloves that I will use when I pump gas.
  • I have masks, thanks to Cynthia. I will use them when I encounter others and will faithfully wear them.
  • The free tours of my rig are on hold for now. 😕
  • I will eat at home almost exclusively. I have a small but efficient kitchen in my rig and it will be used.
  • I am so thankful for my own bathroom. I will be able to avoid public restrooms. And I can shower at ease in my rig.
  • It will be unique to visit others while socially distancing (6-8 feet away), but at least we can visit.

There will be challenges as well. How do I approach laundromats to wash my clothes? I will have to enter a grocery store. I haven’t seen the inside of one since early March.  Remaining alert and attentive will help me weave my way through the challenges as they arise.

This will be a good getaway for me. I have had a lot to deal with in the past six months. I know this adventure out will not be truly normal, yet I hope I still have the excitement of seeking out new adventures and places. This year I will be on a careful and watchful adventure. Normal times are not here yet.

And if things bottom out again in the next week and a half…..it is not a bad option to remain “Sheltered in Place” with my good friends in San Diego.

Today I am thankful for good friends, my rig and knowing how to safely, move through my world.

 

Bienvenue-Welcome

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Samish Bay

Summer is here and it is time to go and explore more new places. I have been working my way to the west coast since April. Yesterday I finally got to touch the Pacific Ocean at Samish Bay, Washington. I felt like I was being welcomed home.

Where have I been? I have been to some really interesting and fun places since I began the drive west, including two weeks in Alaska (without Elsie or the Roadtrek). Cruising the Inside Passage on a small ship cruise was really cool.

I have stopped in many places and all of them have been interesting. Since you have last heard of the places I have been, here is the list. I know some may be a repeat, please be patient.

  • Glacier National Park-one week on the east side and one week in the Kalispell area on the west side. Flowers and wild animals were certainly a highlight.
  • Western Montana for the 4th of July, camping on a beautiful lake with friends.
  • I revisited Idaho and had my first Boondockers Welcome experience. Boondockers is an organization RV,er’s can join. People sign up to be hosts and you can stay in their yards or driveways for 2-3 nights. I stayed with a lovely couple near Farragut State Park on Lake Pend Orielle. I camped in their tree covered yard, visited with the neighbors, visited with my hosts and rode my bike into a beautiful state park. I visited the town of Bayview and saw the floating houses. There are always so many cool things where ever I go.
  • I bicycled the Hiawatha Trail on the Montana-Idaho border. It was very good day.
  • I finally made my way out of Idaho into Washington state. I started in the middle-Cascades, visiting a good friend, Lori, who I have not see in years. It was a really good visit.

Hiking Cascade Pass

  • I arrived in the Northern Cascades and Northern Cascade National Park to spend five days exploring. Wow-that is all I can say. I hiked and walked and took photos. What an amazing place. I chose not to stop in the small towns as there were too many people and events were happening. I camped in a National Forest Campground and loved every minute of it. I hope to go back, maybe when it is not so crazy busy. You should have seen the parade of cars, RV’s, jeeps and trucks driving east along route 20 on Friday afternoon. Everyone from the greater Seattle area was leaving town, or so it seemed.

The last three days I have been in Burlington, WA. I am catching up on chores and fixing EmmyLou the rig so she is ready for tomorrow. Tires?-check. Slow leak in one tire?-check. (it was a screw) After a crazy incident all parts fixed on my rig?-check. Headlight replaced?-check. (one went out when I got here. I even changed it myself) Laundry done?-check. Pedicure done?-check (I have sparklie green toenails) Chiropractor appointment?-check. Billing done?-check. All records ready for entry into Canada tomorrow?-check, I  hope.

I did take time to drive to the coast yesterday afternoon. I visited the small town of Samish. What a pretty little town. I was able to drive to a point in Samish Bay and finally greet the ocean and Jim. (he is buried out there) The flowers are beautiful in people’s yards. It reminded me of my mom and dad, especially when I saw the giant dahlias. My parents loved to garden. It was good to return to the ocean after almost four months away.

Tomorrow I head out on a new adventure. Elsie and I are going to be taking the morning ferry from Anacortes, WA to Vancouver Island, Canada. I first visited this island as a tour director. I remember taking my group to Boutchart Gardens, worth a visit.

Two years ago Cat, my friend who bicycled the Pacific Coast, and I took the ferry from Vancouver to the Island and started south. I knew then that I would return. It is a beautiful Island and I wanted to see more. Tomorrow I get that opportunity. I plan to be there for at least a month and discover interesting and magical places and meet new people. I plan to cover the island, driving biking and walking. If it takes longer, I will stay. I am ready to go into the unknown.

So stay tuned. Come along on the adventure. El and I are getting ready to roll.

 

 

A Mountain Biker’s and Railroad Lover’s Day in the High Country

Point Reyes National Seashore

This post was published on Roadtreking : Celebrating the RV Lifestyle today. I thought I would like to share it with my readers without all the ads.

Many years ago I was visiting a good friend in Santa Cruz, CA. He suggested that we go camping at Point Reyes National Seashore. We took his two mountain bikes and biked into one of the campsites near the ocean.

I had never been on a mountain bike before. As we were dropping down the hill to the campsite a huge boulder suddenly appeared in front of my bike. I put on the brakes, hit the boulder, flipped over the boulder, the bike flipped over and landed on top of me. I ended up with whiplash and lots of bruises. As I lay on the ground my buddy, Neal looked at me and said “Wow, Janet that was a great flip.” So much for sympathy and help.

It took some time to recover from that incident. Since then I have had a few minor incidents with mountain bikes. I have religiously avoided them. Until today.

Today I decided to be brave and rode the Hiawatha Trail on a mountain bike. This hike and bike trail is 15 miles long with 10 train tunnels and 7 sky-high trestles. This Rails to Trails path follows the crest of the Bitterroot Mountains on the border of Montana and Idaho.

I rented a mountain bike, helmet and headlamp at Lookout Pass Ski Resort, mile 0 on Route 90. I put the bike on the back of my Roadtrek and drove to East Portal. East Portal is the beginning of the 15 mile gradual descent.

On a beautiful sunlit day I approached the mile and a half tunnel. I turned on my head lamp and began my descent into darkness. I could only see as far ahead of me as my head lamp would allow. The only sounds were of water, my bike and me letting out an occasional whoop. The echos were great.

Entering the St Paul Pass Tunnel

After my mile and a half ride, I came out into brilliant sunshine, incredible blue skies and a water fall. How much more perfect can one get than that. The temperatures were in the 60’s at the start of the ride. By the time I finished the trail, the temps had climbed into the low 80’s. As the temperature heated up I could smell the pines and the damp earth. It is such a fine smell.

Along the trail there were signs to stop and read and learn about the building of this incredible stretch of railroad. Along the way I learned about the “Silks” and the early days of first class travel on the rail.

Here are a few of my favorite interesting facts.

  • The “Silks” were special trains that transported Asian raw silk from west coast ports across the country to the east for processing into finished garments. These trains were fast and were considered top priority.  Raw silk deteriorated quickly, the price of silk fluctuated rapidly and insurance was high. There was also a fear that silk could be hijacked from slower trains so it was important to move it as quickly as possible. In 1928 at the height of the silk trade $452,000,000 of raw silk was transported across the continent. When other ways of shipping took over (the Panama Canal) the “Silks”run faded away.
  • The railroad was one of the great hirers of freed black slaves. They became porters and waiters on the trains. It was a very different lifestyle than anything they had known before.
  • The Olympian line was the Milwaukee Road’s flagship luxury line to the Pacific Northwest. When introduced in 1911, it was the first railroad to offer “all steel” cars. To further define the uniqueness of the line, the cars and engines were painted orange and maroon and were among the first to carry broadcast radio receivers.
  • The section of the route crossing the rugged Bitterroot Mountains was considered the most scenic stretch of railroad in the country.
  • It was named to the hall of fame by the Rail-to-Trail Conservatory, one of only 15 trails across the United States to receive this designation.

Approaching the end of the St Paul Pass Tunnel

As I approached the end of the trail I had two choices. I could turn around and ride my bike back up the trail I had just come down or I could take the shuttle bus. l climbed on the shuttle bus for the ride back to the St Paul Pass Tunnel. The shuttle dropped me and the other riders off a mile and a half short of the trail head. All of us got to experience the ride through the St Paul Pass tunnel once again. It was a great way to finish the day, riding and whooping into the darkness, once again. It was a great finish to an absolutely beautiful day in the high country.

A favorite view of the trestle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now my day is over and I am camped next to Lake Coeur d’Alene in a National forest campground. I have been for a swim to get the trail dust off. The water was warm on top with a bit of chill coming from below. It felt wonderful. Another good finish to a good day.

Here are suggestions and facts regarding this trail.

  • You can boondock  in the parking lot at the ski resort for free. I did this. It was quiet and peaceful. The workers coming in the morning were a good alarm clock for me.
  • Go early. The rentals open at 8 a.m. The Trail opens at 8:30 a.m. I recommend the early hours because it is cool and pleasant. For you photographers, the lighting was good, really good in the earlier part of the day.
  • There is a fee to ride the trail. You can pay it at the ski resort or at the trail head. These fees help maintain this amazing trail.
  • There is a fee for the shuttle. I did not buy my ticket until I got to the end of the ride. I thought I might pedal, back but there was a very patient little kitty waiting for me to return. After bumping along for 15 miles I was ready to give my seat a respite.
  • This is not a breeze of a ride. You do have to pedal. The trail is well maintained, yet it is dirt and rocks. I wore my bike shorts under a pair of regular shorts.
  • Take snacks and water with you. They also sell snacks and drinks at the trial heads. Just remember that what you take in you need to take back out. There are no trash receptacles along the way.
  • Take your time. Read the signs. Take pictures. Be amazed. It was a delightful day.

Elsie Steals the Computer

Whew it is hard to get this computer to myself. Janet puts it away or takes it with her and I have been wondering how to let my fans know about my adventurous life.

I know not many cats get to do what I am doing. I understand the owners and their own hesitancy. Here is what I want to tell all you cat people out there “Cats are Adapatable”!! I know, I am the world’s worst scaredy cat, yet I like to explore new places and see new things, as long as I have a home to return to when I want security, comfort and a good nap.

I have been to many places since I last posted here. Janet, me and the Roadtrek spent the winter in Arizona, I guess that makes us official snowbirds. I like the idea of Snowcats better. We returned to San Diego in the early spring. Janet says she needed more dental stuff done. I know dental means teeth. I keep trying to tell her that if she ate dry crunchies her teeth would be OK. I don’t know why she doesn’t listen.

Dharma the Dog

Finally in mid-April we left. Since then I have stayed in many interesting places. First stop was to visit a long time friend of Janet’s, Sharon. She lives in a place with “biggggggg…..” rocks everywhere. I had to get used to Dharma the dog. Whew it was hard. Dharma is big and I am small. I am not so sure about dogs but there she was. We stayed inside in a secluded bedroom. Every time I wanted to go somewhere Janet had to carry me. Who would be sniffing right behind? You guessed it Dharma the dog. During the day I would go to the RV so I could look outside and be curious. Who would be outside looking in, you guessed it? Dharma the dog. If we had stayed long enough Dharma may have worn me down and I would have become friends, of sorts, with her. Well maybe.

Since then I have been to the desert, the mountains, the ocean and more. We have camped, rallied (Roadtrek Rally, Monterey) and stayed in people’s homes. I like going back to homes I have been in before. For a while we stayed with Mary, a friend of Janet’s and mine in Medford, Oregon. I remember this house. I have been there before. I love the stairs. I haven’t seen many houses with stairs. They are so much fun to run up and down, over and over again. Janet calls it the rip and tears. I may be older but I love a good run as much as the next cat.

Me groveling with Andrew

For about three weeks we stayed with Linda and Steve and their son Andrew. First Janet was there, then she left, then she came back again. Where does she go? I am not sure. All these other people took good care of me, making sure that I got fed and skritched and loved. I really like Andrew. I am not much of a “guy” cat. Andrew is an exception to that rule. He would come in the room they had set up for me and visit. I admit I kind of ended up groveling a bit when he was around. A cat has to make the best of every situation, right?

These people had other animals. Poncho the dog, kind of ignored me. He didn’t seem to care about me at all. What is wrong with that dog? I am all nervous around him and he pretends I don’t exist. Dogs, go figure. Janet says, Poncho is such a dog. I am not sure what that means but I agree with it. The other animal was Misty the Cat. We didn’t see eye to eye. Whenever we met there was growling and hissing. Setting up territory is hard work.

When Janet returned we arrived at this lovely home that we have been in for about 3 weeks. I like it because, once again, I am the solo pet. I like it when I have Janet to myself. this place has birds and other animals to entertain me when she is out and about. It is nice that she brought my own personal sheepskin inside. I love “making bread” on it and resting in the window where I can watch the world go by. I dream of humming birds. Those swallows make me weary. The just seem to never stop, flitting here and there. I am not sure what birds are about but I like to watch their quickness. It keeps me entertained. Wouldn’t it be interesting to catch one?

Exploring

Janet says we are here to regroup. We have been traveling a lot for the past year. I like stopping for a while. I like the big house. This one has stairs too. I like being able to stretch. I love to rip and tear through this house. All my toys are here, so I can look at them with disdain when someone is looking. Late at night when no one is up I play with them and carry them around the house. They are fun. I pretend they are birds and mice and lizards. I love lizards.

I am not sure how long we are here. I will enjoy all the time I get wherever I am. Life is too short. When things get stressful I will retreat to a time out under the blankets. And when I want to explore the big wide world I will come out from under them and go off and check things out. It helps to have Janet here. She is my rock. I know she will always take care of my base needs. Once in a while when I want her to she will always be there to scratch, love and feed me. We are a team.

Being Sick, Getting Better, Ready to Adventure On.

being sick

At the end of my pet and house sitting gig in Boise, earlier this month, I headed north to McCall, ID hoping to spend the major part of my summer hiking, biking and kayaking and practicing photography.  The same people I house sat for have very generously offered me their second home in the mountains.  Linda accompanied me with plans to spend a week, before returning to her family in Boise. We both got sick. We were both sick for the full time she was there. Arrgh!! This is not how I wanted to spend our time together. I was hoping for hikes and ample time to take photos. Instead we were sick.

I don’t spend much time around large groups of people. I should go out and expose myself more, so that I don’t catch the latest thing that is “going around”. When I worked as a nurse and a tour manager the “bug” exposure was always there and usually one illness  a year would do it. After I started to annually receive the flu shot, even that went away.

Since Jim’s death I have been healthy. With that stressor, I would not have been surprised if I had gotten sick. Stress can do that to a person. It just did not happen. I did have other physical events like a broken ankle but that is not getting sick. That is one of those oops moments that the Arnold girls are prone to. 🙄

Although I love my tiny home, I was very glad to be in a real sticks & bricks house. There was a great deal of comfort, being able to curl up in a firm, double bed with Elsie, my sidekick, curled up next to me. During the day I sat in a comfy chair and watched the weather play out it’s agenda. When I wore out, back to bed I would go. I wonder what I would do if I became sick while traveling in my cute little Roadtrek. One time a few years back I developed a really bad headache and I retreated to a hotel. If I got really sick while on-the-road I think I would retreat to a hotel until I felt better. Maybe I wouldn’t, yet I think my inclination would be to nestle in somewhere.

Except for the cough, I am better. And why is it, that the cough is the last thing to go? I don’t know. Usually for the better part of the day I am fine but when I get weary the cough shows up. Sigh.

After the REI Garage Sale on Saturday, early the next morning I began driving north. Since I still feel in recovery mode I find that if I travel four to five hours in a day, that is enough. I have found wonderful national forest campgrounds each night with nice short or long walks right at the edge of the campground. Tonight I have upgraded to a State Park Campground on the edge of Flathead Lake.

Thursday, I am meeting up with friends in Columbia Falls, MT. We are doing a six day river raft trip on the Flathead River starting near the border of Canada. I am excited to be out and doing.

 

The country I have been exploring has been amazingly beautiful. In the high country it is spring and there are fields of flowers in bloom. Mosquitos abound. A good snowy winter means a lot of standing water this spring. Water=Mosquitos. At one point, I pulled off the road to get a photo from the RT, rolled down the window and within a matter of moments there were mosquitos everywhere. I spent the next twenty minutes chasing the little buggers and, despite bad karma, killed every single one. I have no regrets. After that little fiasco, I had to clean the interior of the front windows. Sigh. I am not a fan of mosquitos. 

Spending the majority outside means that bugs are part of my life. I just like the ones that do not bite or sting. Why can’t we have a mutual agreement to not bother each other? Life is not like that and I have to accept that there will be the infrequent close encounters.

Hmm, I wonder if this could be applied to the rest of my life as well. It is the end of my day and I cannot go to that deep thought place right now.

Montanna

I am looking forward to being on the river. We will be floating near Glacier National Park. It will be stunning country. This type of adventure is one Jim would have enjoyed. This time I will have to enjoy it for both of us. Ready to adventure on.

 

It’s All About Water

Payette River

I am about water. We are all about water. We are made of water. Without water we and this planet would not exist as we know it today.

I love bodies of water great and small. This spring is about water in the west. There has been an abundant supply of snow this past winter and spring runoff is happening, in the lakes, rivers and streams. I have heard several comments from the locals here in Idaho regarding the amount of water in the rivers this spring. “I have never seen the Payette River this high.” “There is usually a beach here.” “Wow!”

Since Jim’s death the ocean has been my friend. I sent his ashes into the Pacific and I have found some comfort in being close to the ocean since then. Leaving the ocean behind was hard for me and I was wondering how much I would miss it. When I discovered these wild flowing bodies of water, I find, I have not missed the ocean one bit.

Pacific Ocean in all it’s Glory

I love water. I love it when it is quiet and meandering. I am attracted to weather at it’s worst. I think many of us are. There is something about nature in all it’s fury that beckons me to go outside, climb the mountain, stand on the sand and witness the un-tameness of it all. Big waves? You bet. Wild surf and bad storms? Yep. I once had to crawl under a boulder on a mountain peak while lightening struck and hail was coming down, fast and furious (it was a surprise storm). At these moments, when nature is in it’s full fury I am reminded that I am a speck in this universe. It is a good reminder and humbling.

Spring is a juicy time of the year. Water abounds and is usually at it’s most prevalent. There is still snow on the mountains, more water is still to come. This year I am going rafting for six days on the Flathead River in Montana. Ah, more water. I love to put my feet in water and if it is warm enough I love swimming in it. In San Diego, the summer is boogie-boarding season. There is a quiet joy in kayaking or paddle-boarding a peaceful lake. It is fun to  meander the shore-lines and see what I can see. There is nothing better than the sound of a loon on a quiet lake.

Fields near Donnelly

Since I have arrived in Donnelly, Idaho, I have been surrounded by large bodies of water, Cascade Lake and Payette Lake. As a nature photographer I really enjoy all this water. It attracts birds and all sorts of wildlife. If I want a chance to photograph, all I have to do is put on some mosquito repellant and sit by a lake or stream and wait. Right now the open fields have quite a bit of water in them. I can stop almost anywhere and wait. If I am quiet and patient enough the animals and birds will come. My favorites this spring are grebes and sandhill cranes. They are my current favorites until something else attracts my attention.

Greebe

Greater Sandhill Crane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cascade Lake

Ponderosa State Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water attracts all of nature, People, animals, birds, bugs-the list could go on. Water is a part of my life and I am happy to have it there. I like to camp next to it. Fishing is fun. There are times that I enjoy renting a hotel room right on the beach and sit and contemplate life, as the waves gently or not so gently crash onto the sand. When evening falls and a lake is still, the sunset is awe inspiring. It quiets my spirit before sleep.

Today and every day I celebrate water in all of it’s wondrous forms.

 

A Quick Update

Poncho

I made it to Boise, Idaho. I am house sitting in this beatifully situated town for a week. My charges are Poncho the dog and Misty the Invisible Cat. Why is she invisible? She resides most of the time under the master bed or under the covers. Ah it reminds me of Elsie the cat.

I am including a link to my latest post on the Roadtreking site.

Roadtreking: Celebrating the Small RV Lifestyle.

I thought you might enjoy reading of my adventures as I was heading for Idaho. Click on the underlined link above and it will take you to this post. I guest post for this site approximately twice a month. If you enjoy RV’ing you may want to follow this blog.

I also have updated my photos of my travels. If you would like to see more of these click on the link below and it will take you there.

Photos of Life in a Small Motorhome

When you look at the page on Shutterfly I have added some new albums. Zion National Park would be a good place to start and then move on from there. Idaho will be starting soon.😀

I am in Boise until later this week. When Linda and Steve return I will be heading north to Donnelly and McCall, Idaho. I am looking forward to spending some time in one place. It is time to catch up and reflect on a year since I sold my house and moved into my small and comfortable RV full time. There is more to come.

Meanwhile, I hope you are celebrating Memorial Day, well. Get out the grill and enjoy the day. While you are having fun and enjoying the beginning of summer, never forget what this holiday is all about. I remember as a child we would drive by cemetaries and see the American flag flying from the majority of graves. It was and always is a touching thing to see. Remember to honor those who have served or are serving today. It is part of the freedom we enjoy.