A Change in Attitude

Monday I went in search for rhubarb. Did you know that Washington State is a prime producer of rhubarb? I did not know this but as I drive or bike around the island I have noticed the Rhubarb for Sale signs at the end of driveways. I love rhubarb. This rhubarb search started because of a recipe published in the New York Times for Vanilla Bean Rhubarb Cobbler. There is rhubarb growing where I am house sitting but not enough.

I have been feeling a bit lonely and out of sorts for the past few days. I have been feeling sorry for myself. I find it hard to be solo in a society that favors couples and relationships. This is not my world. I am not sure what my world should be. Covid has made me even more confused and lost. This was my mood as I ventured off to find rhubarb.

My day changed. My attitude shifted.

My first stop was a farm stand with a coffee stand, produce and plants for the garden. The two women behind the coffee cart helped me weigh out the rhubarb. We chatted and laughed. I ordered a cup of coffee and then discovered this was a brand new enterprise, having only been open for two days. We talked about living in an RV and house sitting. They were so kind and helpful and my attitude shifted with this momentary conversation and feeling of worthiness. Happily with rhubarb in hand, I departed.

My mini-aventure in happiness and self worth continued.

I am having a major issue with my refrigerator door. It kind of fell off because of broken plastic parts that have worn with time. Buying a new door is expensive. I am a do it myself kind of woman and I have decided that I want to try to fix it. I have been studying this door and thinking. Today since I was near Home Depot I thought I would walk in with my door in hand and ask some of the experts.

I was standing in the aisle with all the nuts and bolts and doing the Home Depot stare. The stare was something I learned from Jim and I often notice it on people, especially men in these kind of stores. Now I do it too.

This man in an orange top was walking down the aisle. I assumed he was an employee. I stopped him and started to ask for his help. He said he was busy and left. A few minutes later he returned and asks me about the door. I showed it to him and explained the problem. I need to figure out some way to secure the door and replace or fix the broken parts. He looked at it for a few minutes and came up with a suggestion. The first idea didn’t pan out so we started talking it through again and he came up with a great idea and even better, one I can do myself.

I took a close look at him and realized he was not wearing a Home Depot employee vest or work uniform. He had an orange safety vest on. I said to him “you don’t work here do you?”. He smiled and said no. He works contract for the military in Oak Harbor. He said that people often mistake him for a employee of Home Depot as he frequents the store as part of his job. Sean and I had a great conversation and he figured out a solution to the issue at hand. He made my day. I was so surprised that he came back to help me. The smallest interactions sometimes offer the greatest rewards.

I now have a plan and hopefully the door will be fixed within the week.

Since I was in Oak Harbor and had not really visited this part of the Island I looked at a map and figured out how to take the backroads close to the west side of the Island on my return Greenbank. I discovered Joseph Whidbey State Park. Every State Park I have been to in Washington is very pretty. This park did not disappoint. I hiked a short trail to the beach and started to stroll up the beach. As I walked by a family, two adults and two children, the woman got up, with mask in place and asked me if I was looking for agates. They proceeded to show me all the agates they had found and told me it was a hobby that everyone enjoyed. She guaranteed that I would find some. Well she was wrong, however, I was given the gift of another momentary interaction that made me feel unique and worthy.

Searching for Agates

I have my rhubarb and a plan of action for my refrigerator door repair. I certainly have a much better attitude and outlook than when I left home this morning. Sometimes the smallest interactions are the mightiest. I came home feeling happy after a fun-filled day of small interactions with other people. My self worth had increased and I currently find no traces of my morning attitude. It helped to be out in nature for part of the day. I saw some new birds which is always exciting. I have also discovered another park that I would like to go back and explore more. Maybe I will find an agate.

Today I am thankful for the unseen guidance that puts me in the right place to receive what I need at this moment in time. Today I am grateful for all the tiny moments given to me by others to brighten my day and my awareness. Today I am Thankful.

Exploring Without & Within

Wow, I have been on the Island for close to a month. Where does the time go? What have I been doing?

I have been enjoying my time here. The place I am staying is definitely a home. I have felt welcomed and comfortable. I keep thinking I will get tired of the sunsets, yet each time I see one, I am amazed again. Almost everywhere I wander I meet up with eagles. They still thrill me when I see them.

I have been told by my neighbors and the locals that this past week has been highly unusual for Whidbey Island. It has been sunny, warm and beautiful. I have had ample time to find hiking trails and beaches to walk on. I have finally gotten my bicycle out and took a hilly ride near where I live. And today it is raining, a soft quiet female rain.

Although I have been completely vaccinated I have been trying to figure out what is next. I am very wary of being around people. I am concerned about interacting at a close range with others. A few days ago there was an article in the New York Times “The U.S. Is Opening Up. For the Anxious, That Comes With a Cost”. It was an interesting article Parts of it rang true for me.

When does necessity become a habit? If it is a habit and it is not quite as necessary to be so strict, how do I break this habit or at least loosen up my lifestyle a bit? I really don’t know what the answers are to these questions. I think I will need to continue to take baby steps. I have moved into a loose bubble with my neighbors Robyn & Tom. We have all been vaccinated. I enjoy their company. They are more comfortable with moving back towards a new normal. Sometimes they take me along.

I have now been out to dinner once in an inside restaurant with a great view of the Port Townsend Ferry. The tables were socially distanced, and had high backs. Everyone was wearing their masks appropriately. It felt safe and it was fun to be out and about. Would I do this very often? No, I prefer outside dining or takeout.

Friday night I went to the movies with these same neighbors. There is a small old theater in the town of Langley. The Clyde theater has been owned by the same family for years and everyone knows each other. To encourage people to return to their movie theater, they have been careful. Every other row was roped off. If you were in a party of three or more you had a row to yourselves. There were less than thirty people in the theater. It was fun and felt like an adventure. They now have a Saturday matinee for fully vaccinated people. Would I do this type of activity often? No, yet it was a step in the right direction for me. The movie was Nomadland.

Company has been arriving on my doorstep. My friend Melissa who lives in Seattle is taking full advantage of our close proximity. On the first visit, we introduced our germs to each other, sitting on the deck, sans mask, and walking the beaches. At the end of the day, she returned to Seattle. Since then we have enjoyed each other’s company in my current home twice more. We have known each other since the mid-seventies and we have a lot of catching up to do. What makes it even more fun is that she is active and we have been hiking and kayaking together. I am enjoying her company.

Pat, another northwestern US friend has also come for a visit. She lives on San Juan Island so we are not too far apart. I met her at the Mt Vernon Tulip Festival and had a marvelous time. Then she returned to my house for a few nights. We spent one whole day sitting on the back deck, talking, bird watching and definitely catching up on our lives. I have written about Pat before. She diverted her trip in November 2019 to come and give me support after my sweet Elsie the Cat disappeared. A true friend indeed.

This coming month I am planning to adventure out a little more. It is time to explore further than the island boundaries. I am hoping to spend a few nights on the Olympic Peninsula. It is time to spread my wings. It is time to remind myself to trust science, to trust the vaccines I have received. It is time to dip my toe in the water realistically and practically. It is time to enjoy each day, be grateful for life and maybe reach a little beyond my current comfort range.

Change Happens

Elliot Community Hospital

In 1970 I began my education to become a registered nurse. I went to a three-year diploma school, Elliot Community Hospital School of Nursing in Keene, New Hampshire. I became aware for the first time of the resistance of people to change. In the last year of school, a new hospital was built; Cheshire Hospital. It had all the latest equipment and technology. There were single and double rooms. There was air conditioning. It was new and amazing. Three months before I graduated patients were moved and the old hospital closed.

You would think that everyone who worked in the old hospital, which had been in existence since the late 1800’s, would have been excited and looking forward to moving into a hospital with the latest of everything.

The old hospital did not have air conditioning. I remember taking care of patients and then going to find a fan to cool off. Often patients were situated in the hallways with curtains around their beds as there was not enough space to accommodate all of those in need of hospitalization. It was archaic.

Change was in the air. Many of the nurses who worked in the old hospital were hesitant and angry about the move. They were used to where they worked and were resisting change. They didn’t need all the new things at the new hospital. Things worked just fine where they were. They feared the unknown.

The student nurses could not figure out why these nurses were so hesitant. We knew it would be a lot of work to move everyone, yet we were looking forward to the shift to the new hospital. Who wouldn’t want to be in a brand new building with the latest of everything? We were excited and looking forward.

About two years ago WordPress, the host site for my blog announced that it was going to gradually change the editing program, from a Classic Editor to a Word Block Editor. I was given the chance to learn how to use the new editing system. They had video tutorials. They continue to offer online support. I have been resisting this change since they announced it. I didn’t have time to learn it. I liked the old system. Why change something that is working? Oh my, I sound like those nurses at the hospital.

When did I become resistant to change?

I have been putting off learning the new format until I had to change. That change came with my last post. I can no longer access the Classic Editor. I have no choice now, but to learn this new format. I am struggling to learn. I know I will succeed (look at what I am doing now), yet it is a struggle. I am busy watching tutorials. I have been on chat with the WordPress agents. They are patient and knowledgeable. It helps to know I am not alone in my quest to learn this new system.

Not only do I have to learn a new editing system but the theme I use for this blog is also no longer available and it has been suggested that I change the theme before I can no longer use it. I am glad that I am in one place and have the time to sit and learn all these new ideas. Expect changes in the look of my blog. Things might look different for a while until I get everything figured out.

 Insight into change teaches us to embrace our experiences without clinging to them — to get the most out of them in the present moment by fully appreciating their intensity, in full knowledge that we will soon have to let them go to embrace whatever comes next.

Insight into change teaches us hope. Because change is built into the nature of things, nothing is inherently fixed, not even our own identity. No matter how bad the situation, anything is possible. We can do whatever we want to do, create whatever world we want to live in, and become whatever we want to be.

All About Change by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Change is a part of my life. Change is part of your life. Change is a part of everyone’s life. We may not always recognize when it begins to happen. We may resist it. We may fight it but change is guaranteed to happen.

I have experienced a lot of change since I started this blog (look at the archives, they are an interesting read). As I look back at my life, change has been consistently a part of my life. I continue to learn that nothing is fixed or permanent and that change is always possible. Change is inevitable. I have not always embraced change when it has arrived on my doorstep, yet it is there.

Today I am embracing change and learning about this new way of editing. I would like to think that this past pandemic year (The Great Pause) has allowed me time to discover and explore change. I hope to come out of this time a better and more complete person, and more accepting of change in my personal life and in the world around me.

Already on the Road

On the Beach at Pt Mugu

Usually, I title a post “Getting Ready to Roll” when I am preparing to move in my rig.  I can’t do it this time as I am already on the road. This morning I departed San Diego for the season. After a difficult farewell with Cynthia and Ward, I began the drive north on a beautiful and chilly Southern California morning. 

 

One may ask, Where are you heading? That would be a fair question to ask. I have not told many what my plans are. I didn’t want to jinx it. I am going to be house-sitting for friends on Whidbey Island, near Seattle. I will be there until some time in June. I am so excited. I have never been there so it is a brand new place for me to explore. My bike is ready and my kayak as well. I am ready too.

Whidbey Island is the largest of the islands composing Island County.  It is about 30 miles north of Seattle. The island forms the northern boundary of Puget Sound. It is ranked as the fourth longest and fourth-largest island in the contiguous United States, behind Long Island, Padre Island, Isle Royale.

Hopefully my Northwest friends will pay special heed to this post. I am sure we can figure out some way to safely visit. Oh I hope so.

It feels good to “get on the road”. The adventurer in me takes over and who knows what may happen from there. I am thankful that I have a large country to explore as I am still not feeling comfortable traveling by air. It is good to have so much to explore outside my own front door.

A Beautiful Sycamore at My Campsite

Today I took a drive up the Pacific Coast Highway, through Malibu, ending at Point Mugu State Park. It is a small park with a small beach on the Pacific Coast. There are many hiking trails and it is a quick walk to the beach. It is hard to believe I am not far from Los Angeles and millions of people. Yet here I am snuggled into my RV after a short walk earlier in the afternoon. I am camped among the sycamore trees and it is quite lovely here.

I usually get a bit apprehensive when I leave for a new place. Today I did not feel that. For that I am thankful. I was able to sit back and enjoy the ride. It helps to have good audiobooks to listen to.

So get ready to come along for the ride, I will have new photos to share and new stories to tell. Come on along.

 

My West Coast Family

Santa Barbara Sunset

I spent four days last week in Santa Barbara, CA. I traveled north to get some inside repairs done on my rig, EmmyLou.

Santa Barbara is such a lovely town sitting out on the Pacific. I stayed in an Air BnB very near the coastline. I could walk or ride my bike almost anywhere. I rode my bike back to the Air BnB after I had dropped my rig off. Even the bike ride was a pretty one. It makes me want to return to that area and spend more time.

Santa Barbara Mission

In the last thirteen years of my working life, I was a Tour Manager and Tour Guide. I often took people on tours to the Santa Barbara area. I know this type of work sounds glamorous but let me tell you it is work. I had to be responsible and ready twenty-four hours a day. And I had to be the expert. What’s that tree? What’s that rock? Who lived in that house? Although fun could be exhausting.

I enjoyed spending time alone in this town. I could finally do what I wanted and when I wanted. I could explore and get to know this area my way. It was a quiet and fun-filled four days. My rig is ready to roll. I had some time to explore at my pace, at my leisure.

Last Saturday I returned to San Diego for the final medical tests of the year. I am one year out post-treatment for thyroid cancer. These tests are now done and I am awaiting results.

Driving north or south on the coastline in southern California means that at some point I have to drive through Los Angeles. The ride up was easy. The return ride was a little how I remember the traffic in LA  pre-Covid. As I drove through the “Valley” my thoughts turned to Jim’s family. I connect that drive through Northridge and Chatsworth with the Fenningham family. It still feels odd to not exit the freeway and drive to “Mom’s” house. Each time I drive through that area I remember times with Jim’s parents and sisters. After both parents died his sisters and I have gradually moved forward with our lives and don’t stay in touch. We all move on yet I still miss this connection with Jim. I think of his family often and hope they are doing well. I also wonder if there will come a time when I drive through that area and don’t reflect back.

My West Coast Mom

I am grateful his family was so inclusive when Jim was alive. I felt like I had a mother on the west coast after my mom on the east coast died. She was instrumental in keeping the family together. The whole family took me in as another member. I am grateful I had those twenty-one years with my west coast family.

Now my rig is ready to roll and so am I. I am taking a few precious days to enjoy Cynthia’s and Ward’s company before I head out on Wednesday of next week. We have been quite a household. I will miss their company.

Today I am thankful for all those years I had with my west coast family. I am thankful that I still feel so much love and kindness for them. Their support after Jim’s death was important and wonderful to have. I am thankful for friends who become family. Today I am thankful.

 

 

 

My Bounce Around Month-The Challenges of Personal Growth

Sunset on Squaw Lake

After spending two weeks in the desert I once again have returned to San Diego. No, wait, I am in Santa Barbara. I call this month my bounce-around month. I am moving about the southern California area to finish this visit for the year.

Why am I bouncing around.

  • I really wanted some time in the desert and two weeks was all I could find this year to venture to the east.
  • I received my second Pfizer vaccine on March 1 in San Diego. I am doing well.
  • My rig, EmmyLou is getting things done. First, she had the outside fixed. Now we are working on the inside.  RV’s need check-ups. Today we are in Santa Barbara to meet up with Dan Neely. He is one of the Roadtrek Gurus, traveling up and down California to make it easier for his customers to meet up with him.
  • I have to return to San Diego as I have a few more tests to finish up my first post-year thyroid check-up. (I had thyroid cancer a little over a year ago) Oh and I am getting old, I have to have my left eye checked for a cataract. But I don’t feel old!

Rope Canyon & Peggy

Ladder Canyon & yours truly

My trip to the desert was grand. I camped and hiked and biked and kayaked. Although most of my friends were not in the desert this winter, a few were. Peggy and Roger have managed to figure out how to be in the desert and social distance this year. Peggy took a few nights to come and camp with me. It was good to meet up with her. We did some amazing hikes-ones that challenged me. The most rigorous one was when we took an early wrong turn in the Mecca Hills and ended in Rope Canyon instead of Ladder Canyon. After we tackled the first rope in this beautiful slot canyon we decided we were in the wrong canyon and hiked back out. Then we decided to tackle Ladder Canyon. It was a challenge but after Rope Canyon it was definitely easier. It is a beautiful place in the desert.

Squaw Lake Kayak

I met up with Cori another Roadtreker at Squaw Lake, a dammed lake on the lower Colorado River. There are several lakes just north of Yuma that is part of the Imperial Dam Water District. This is a great place for boaters, fishermen, and other watersports lovers. The lakes are gentle and easy to navigate. We also kayaked to the River and went up river first so we could float back down to the lake entrance. It was a fun adventure with Cori. We hiked and kayaked for two days before I needed to return to San Diego.

My adventures in the desert were not always fun. Friendships can be hard as well as rewarding. I sometimes wonder if I know how to communicate as well with others now that I have been on my own for so long. I tend towards introversion (yes, really) and since I have been staying away from people I wonder if I need to break into the world of others more carefully and slowly.

I have learned a valuable lesson on my desert trip this year. Being respected is important to me. I try hard to respect others and I have grown enough, now to count on others to appreciate me. When that doesn’t happen then it is time to leave and regroup. I also need time to remind myself that I am a good and worthy human being and worthy of being appreciated.

Argh! Growing is hard and challenging. I have a friend who turns 90 this year who told me once that I will still be growing when I reach 80. When growth is easy, it is fun and exciting. When growth is not so easy, it is challenging and hard. It is often the challenging steps that are the most rewarding.

A Santa Barbara Sunset

I will be in the lovely town of Santa Barbara for two more nights and then will head south. I am staying in an Airbnb in a quaint section of the city. I am one block from the beach and it is quite beautiful. This morning I dropped my rig off and then bicycled the 13 miles back to my residence. This afternoon I will repeat the process to pick her back up.

The adventure of life continues. I am grateful for the challenges that come my way. I am grateful for my friends who love and respect me. I sometimes grudgingly appreciate those who challenge me and help me grow. I am thankful for the mechanics and others who help my tiny home of wheels stay in tip-top shape. I am really thankful for my tiny home. Today I am thankful for a blue sky, classic sunny southern CA day.

 

Hope. Keeping things Merry and Bright

This year is ending and none too soon. It has been a very different year as we have all been weaving our way through the Covid Pandemic. Schools are closed-Schools are open-Nope, closed. Masks are mandatory. People protests wearing masks others ask to do it for the sake of everyone. It is difficult to visit with family in person. Social distancing is the norm. Who is in my Bubble? Zoom has quickly become the normal way of staying in touch with friends and family. The oddest one for me is trying to grasp that our loved ones cannot accompany us into the hospital, no matter what the reason.

And now-the vaccines have arrived and there is hope.

There is always hope. When my world has been at it’s bleakest, I can still see hope and a brighter day on the horizon. Hope does not have to be a large shining light, although it is nice when it happens. Hope may sometimes be just a smile or a card or a message saying hang in there, and I care about you as a valued human being on this planet. Right after Jim died hope arrived with my sister who came to spend time with me. When she left my friend Helen arrived.  Having friends that care and make their presence known is often my beacon of hope. 

More people are alone on this holiday which is often about family and friends. This year though families find it hard to get together. This year friends find it difficult to gather. I could point out all the disappointments yet I would rather look towards what has been positive for me this year. I prefer to find my way towards hope. 

I know that people with extroverted tendencies have found it hard to be alone. Some have chosen to take a chance on socializing over quarantine. I understand that. Although many of you who know me may think I am an extrovert, you could be surprised to know that I am not. I love to be with people and then I need my alone time. I spent most of this summer and fall alone in Idaho. I found I was getting stronger in the core of my being. As I was driving south in the fall I discovered comfort in who I am. There is an inner core of strength and self-confidence that has surfaced. Spending time alone has given me the gift of insight and growth. 

I have spent a lot of time outdoors. Exploring nature is a  healthy choice. Research has shown that a walk in the woods or along the shore can be healing and mood-lifting. I would agree with this. I am thankful for the most amazing places I have been to. I am thankful for the time I have taken to know the mountains, the coast, the canyons, and the deserts. Each time I am out in nature I feel a tug in my soul to be open to what is around me.

Sandhill Cranes in Flight

Nature is amazing. This summer I wandered the dry lake bed in Idaho. I would sit on rocks and logs and wait. One late afternoon I looked up just in time to have three Sandhill Cranes fly low over my head. Now that is amazing. Nature gives me hope.

Through all the craziness of this past year, I have discovered kindness in people. Neighbors helping neighbors. Strangers helping strangers. It might be nothing big. I have noticed that people are performing small acts of kindness. Someone buys another person’s coffee. Early in the pandemic, I put out a request on Nextdoor (the app & website) regarding where to buy toilet paper. Within a short time, I received enough toilet paper to maintain this household for quite some time. People added other items to their gift of toilet paper. When one person does this often there is a chain effect of kindness and generosity. Small acts of kindness give me hope. 

A new US administration arrives in January. Whether one likes this or not, change is good. Change offers hope. Hope for growth as a nation. Hope for growth as a state. Hope for growth as an individual. What a way to welcome the New Year. There is such a possibility in the unknown. Will this administration succeed? Will some of the anger subside? Oh, I hope so. At the moment, all of this is untapped potential for growth and change. It is exciting and scary all at the same time. There is hope.

Yesterday, for this non-church going individual, I attended two virtual church services. One in Ohio and one in San Diego. What was the topic of each of the sermons? Hope. I guess I am on the right track. One sermon spoke of hope as that little tiny beacon of a light way out there on the horizon. It may be tiny but it is there. 

For the end of this year and the coming year as well I wish that this spot on the horizon becomes larger and larger as we reach for the unknown New Year. 

 

 

 

 

 

Rounding up the Wagon, Heading South

Tomorrow, Wednesday, I am reluctantly leaving Idaho for points south. Why? This weekend it is suppose to drop to the teens (F) at night and the temperature is also going to be chilly during the day. I don’t do cold and I don’t do snow. It is time to head south.

A Beautiful Fall Day

It is hard to leave Idaho. I love the country here, yet more importantly, I love my friends Linda and Steve. I have felt safe and secure in their borrowed home about 2 hours north of Boise. I have been in Boise at their full-time home for the past couple of weeks. I have enjoyed the company and the ease of our companionship. We have walked and hiked and talked a lot. Linda and I are both birders so we have been out searching for the birds and enjoying beautiful fall days.

Now it is time to venture south. Before I do, however, I will be heading east and to the Camas Wildlife Refuge to find the Sandhill Cranes. I love them. I follow those birds everywhere. The best part of heading four hours east is… Linda will be taking her Roadtrek and joining me. We are both photographers and bird watchers. It is fun to have company to explore a new area. It is fun to have someone to ooh and ahh with. I am looking forward to the company and the fun.

Sandhill Cranes

Friday I will drive south looking for warmer weather. By the end of the month, I will arrive in San Diego. I will get all my medical and dental checkups done, visit with friends (from a safe distance). No later than January I will head east to the California Desert and points east. It is desert season.

The adventure of my current lifestyle continues. I am getting ready to get on-the-road. I hope you will continue to follow along on my adventures. 

 

 

How Plans Can Change in a Moment

This morning I drove to McCall to pick up my groceries and run a few errands. Everything was fine. I began the return trip to Donnelly and all of a sudden my rig wouldn’t go over 45 mph. What!!! I had trouble getting my sweet girl to get up the minor hills. I was glad to get her back to the house.

With one phone call to Coach-net, my roadside assist, they gently and kindly took the decision making out of my hands. After a few conversations, they had contacted Mercedes Benz in Boise. After another conversation, I found that the towing will be included. It is 94 miles to Boise from here so I am thankful for the free tow. Did you know that if you have work done on your Mercedes within a year Mercedes will free tow your vehicle? Sweet!!! Coach-net told me the towing would be covered no matter what. Sweet!!!

Now I have an appointment with Mercedes Benz in Boise for the third week of this month. I am going to winterize my rig, just to be safe. Next week they will pick up my rig and tow it to Boise. My friend Linda and the owner of my summer home in Idaho is coming to pick me up next week. Together we will winterize the rig, and close the house for the winter. I have a home to wait in in Bosie while I wait for the rig. I have friends to visit and stay safe with. Maybe I will even get a cat, back on my bed.

Small town living has its bonuses. I called the Chamber of Commerce in McCall to inquire about rental cars. They guided me to the local small airport. They will have a car for me tomorrow. Since I don’t have a way to get to McCall they are coming to pick me up. Small towns are marvelous for personal service. I am feeling blessed. I am thankful for being in a small town where everyone will pitch in and help.

 

This afternoon I am thankful for so much. I am thankful that I was not on the road somewhere remote and distant. I am thankful I was able to drive my rig, slowly and carefully back to my summer home. I am thankful for Coach-net who took me into their hands and guided me to the right contacts. I am very thankful for Linda and Steve who are taking me into their home in Boise. First, they offer me this place and now their home. It is good to have such good friends.

Things can change at a moment’s notice.